Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Query Questions with Ali Herring



Writers have copious amounts of imagination. It's what makes their stories so fantastic. But there's a darker side to so much out of the box thinking. When a writer is in the query trenches, their worries go into overdrive. They start pulling out their hair and imagine every possible disaster.

Here to relieve some of that endless worrying is a series called Query Questions. I'll ask the questions which prey on every writer's mind, and hopefully take some of the pain out of querying. These are questions that I've seen tossed around on twitter and other writing sites. They are the type of questions that you need answers from the real expert--agents!

Today we hear from Ali Herring of Spencerhill Associates.

Is there a better or worse time of year to query?

I slow down a bit during the summer, so the calendar school year is the absolute best time to query me from the perspective of a faster response time. That being said, you can and should query me any time of the year since I read queries in order of those received first, so it’s best to get in line!

Also, just a note here: Please DO NOT query me via the submission@spencerhill... email address. Only query via Query Manager here: https://querymanager.com/query/1032/. If you’ve queried via the email, go back and submit on the query manager site! Thanks!


Do you look at sample pages without fail or only if the query is strong?

I almost always read a portion of the sample, even if the query isn’t strong so I don’t punish someone who isn’t good at pitching themselves. And a lot of times, I’ll read the sample first. I will not read the sample, however, if the word count is incredibly high for the genre or the query doesn’t have a strong hook or stakes.



How open are you to writers who have never been published?

Very open! I love working with and discovering new talent! In fact, my fantastic client Kurt Kirchmeier is a debut author who came to me in my query inbox. He had responded to a #MSWL of mine, and not long after that we had a deal with Little, Brown Books for Young Readers for his middle grade novel, THE ABSENCE OF SPARROWS. It’s out May 7, 2019 and we just did the cover reveal.
Check it out, pretty huh?



Kurt’s posted links on his website to pre-order at www.kurtkirchmeier.net. So run check it out for me ok! This will give you an idea of what I’m after with Middle Grade too.



The dreaded rhetorical question in a query. Are they as taboo as the rumors say?

Good question. For me, no. Hook me anyway you can. However, if you give me a “high-concept” two- or three-sentence pitch right after “Dear Ali…” with the stakes right there front and center instead, you’re doing yourself a favor.



How important are comp titles? Is it something you want to see in a query? Are movie/tv reference okay as comp titles?

Yes, I want to see comp titles in the query. They are incredibly important, because they tell me you know where your book should be shelved and that there’s an audience for your work. I’ve been confused by a plot summary before in a query, but chose to read the sample just because the querying author gave stellar comps that made me curious. Movie/TV comps are great too. However, I would prefer XXX movie/tv show meets XXX book, so you can show me a book comp that’s already on the shelf too.



Do you prefer a little personalized chit-chat in a query letter or would you rather hear about the manuscript?

Yes, if it’s authentic. If you came to me via a #MSWL or we chat on Twitter a lot (yes, I’m chatty), or you have something in common we share, etc, then by all means, yes. Otherwise, just tell me about the manuscript.



How many queries do you receive in a week? How many requests might you make out of those?

This fluctuates but about 50-75 a week in general.

Considering Spencerhill asks for three chapters up front and the synopsis, I probably tend to make less requests than an agent whose firm asks for a 10-page sample only. So out of those 100 queries, I’ll probably only make one request. Sometimes two, but it’s rare.



How do you feel about writers nudging on full/partial requests? At what point is it appropriate?

I don’t mind a nudge after 2 months.



When a writer nudges with an offer, what length of time is helpful to give you enough time to consider? A week? Two weeks?

Two weeks would be awesome, but I find writers tend to give only one. It’s hard for them to wait that long—I totally get it. But it could be to an author’s advantage to do so. For instance, I’ve had two authors this week let me know they have offers of rep but asked me to still consider their work. I’m going to a conference Thursday so that makes things incredibly tight for me to read and make decisions on two books by Friday! If I had two weeks, I’d be golden.



Many agents say they don't care if writers are active online. Could a twitter account or blog presence by a writer tip the scales in getting a request or offer? And do you require writers you sign to start one?

A lack of social media presence will never not stop me from offering rep. That being said, it certainly doesn’t hurt. And I love when I can look at an author’s Twitter feed and get to know them a little bit first. I don’t require writers to join social media when I sign them, but it’s my advice they should. Building community and growing a potential marketing platform for when books sell is just good planning.



If a writer makes changes to their manuscript due to feedback should they resend the query or only if material was requested? Does it make a difference if the changes are from an R&R with another agent? What themes are you sick of seeing?

Only if it’s requested should they resubmit it. But you can and should always query with NEW work. I’ve signed writers whose second project I connected with, but not their first.  

If the changes came from an R&R with another agent, it’s probably best to only send new work to me at that point still.

In romantic suspense, I’d like to see stories that aren’t all centered on law enforcement officers, etc. Give me a new angle there.



Do you look at trends or editor wishlists when deciding to sign a manuscript?

No, but if I know an editor is looking for something and I connect with a piece that fits it, that’s a good sign.



Do you consider yourself a hands-on, editorial type of agent?

Yes! Very much so.



Does a manuscript have to be sub-ready or will you sign stories that need work?

I will sign authors who need a little work, but it needs to be almost there or easily fixable. Sometimes in this case, I’ll do an R&R if it’s not-quite “almost there.”



What is your biggest query pet peeve?

My biggest pet peeve is people lying on queries, saying some editor I’ve never met before told them at so-and-so conference I didn’t attend that they should query me. I’m also not a fan of people pitching more than one book. I delete those queries.



Is there anything that automatically sinks a query for you?

If you don’t give me the stakes of the novel, I won’t request.



What three things are at the top of your submission wish list?
  1. Upper Middle grade fiction that is high-concept but with literary writing – especially dark or scary fantasy right now, or something with incredible world building.
  2. Category romance – both inspirational and secular. Would really love some romantic suspense.
  3. I’d like a utopian YA novel with a dark, dangerous undertone.

What are some of your favorite movies or books to give us an idea of your tastes?

BOOKS: Across the Universe by Beth Revis, The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker, Tau Zero by Poul Anderson, Consider (The Holo Series) by Kristy Acevedo, The Box Car Children, The City of Ember by Jeanne Duprau, Percy Jackson by Rick Riordan, Wonder by R. J. Palacio, The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill. TV: Netflix's Travelers Series, Big Bang Theory, Castle 




Ali joined Spencerhill in 2017 after moving back to Georgia from Connecticut, where she interned for a literary agency in the greater NYC metro area. A former magazine associate editor, Ali has a diverse background in communications and editing. She graduated valedictorian of her class at Berry College in 2001, where she obtained her bachelor’s degree in Journalism. She is seeking middle grade and young adult fiction in all genres, science fiction and fantasy, romance, southern women’s fiction, and inspirational fiction, especially romance. She particularly likes high-concept commercial fiction with a literary flair. If you'd like a better idea of her interests, you can find her on Twitter, @HerringAli, where she regularly posts #MSWL's.


Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Query Questions with Jessica Errera

Writers have copious amounts of imagination. It's what makes their stories so fantastic. But there's a darker side to so much out of the box thinking. When a writer is in the query trenches, their worries go into overdrive. They start pulling out their hair and imagine every possible disaster.

Here to relieve some of that endless worrying is a series called Query Questions. I'll ask the questions which prey on every writer's mind, and hopefully take some of the pain out of querying. These are questions that I've seen tossed around on twitter and other writing sites. They are the type of questions that you need answers from the real expert--agents!

I'm thrilled to be back with another Query Questions interview from Jess Errera of The Jane Rotrosen Agency. Let's get to know more about her.
 

1.      Is there a better or worse time of year to query? Any time of year is fine by me. I read queries all year round.

2.      Do you look at sample pages without fail or only if the query is strong? If the pitch is lacking but I like the concept, I will always review the pages—after all, not every author is great at pitching. However, if it’s something truly outside my wheelhouse, then I’m less likely to read on.

3.      How open are you to writers who have never been published? Entirely open. Welcoming, in fact!

4.      The dreaded rhetorical question in a query. Are they as taboo as the rumors say? This doesn’t bother me at all. I’m a fan of a tagline if it’s strong and suits the work, but a bad one isn’t a deterrent.

5.      How important are comp titles? Is it something you want to see in a query? Are movie/tv reference okay as comp titles? I love to see comp titles, including tv/movies. The caveat being that they should be realistic—there are some books and movies that are so big that they aren’t as useful as comps, so authors should select carefully. They should also be recent titles or, if they’re older, ones we still reference regularly.

6.      Do you prefer a little personalized chit-chat in a query letter or would you rather hear about the manuscript? I don’t mind chit-chat, but it’s the quality of your work that’s going to get me hooked. I’d focus on being polite, informed, and crafting a strong pitch.

7.      How many queries do you receive in a week? How many requests might you make out of those? This is hard to pinpoint as it really fluctuates from week-to-week. 

8.      How do you feel about writers nudging on full/partial requests? At what point is it appropriate? I think after 4-6 weeks it’s ok to check in on a request.

9.      When a writer nudges with an offer, what length of time is helpful to give you enough time to consider? A week? Two weeks? If you have solicited reads from a number of agents it is courteous to contact those agents and give them an opportunity to respond before you make a decision. I don’t think that there is any prescribed length of time for this, but rather something I would decide on a case-by-case basis.

10.  Many agents say they don't care if writers are active online. Could a twitter account or blog presence by a writer tip the scales in getting a request or offer? And do you require writers you sign to start one? Having a platform is certainly attractive to a potential publishing partner and, as such, a large one can be an asset. However, the writing must be strong above all else. And I do think every author should be using at least one social media channel to engage with readers and build a community.

11.  If a writer makes changes to their manuscript due to feedback should they resend the query or only if material was requested? Does it make a difference if the changes are from an R&R with another agent? I’m always happy to see revised material if it means you’re putting your best foot forward, but best to send it as early as possible in case I’ve already dipped in.

12.  Do you look at trends or editor wishlists when deciding to sign a manuscript? I do consider trends and I wouldn’t be a good advocate for you if I didn’t. I have to feel confident that I know multiple editors looking for the kind of story you’ve written before I can (or should) agree to represent an author.

13.  Do you consider yourself a hands-on, editorial type of agent? Does a manuscript have to be sub-ready or will you sign stories that need work? Every project is unique and so this decision is made on a case-by-case basis. If I feel editorial work will enhance the marketability of a project, that’s an option I am happy to present to the author. But of course, it’s always the author’s call depending on whether or not the feedback resonates with them. 

14.  What is your biggest query pet peeve? Is there anything that automatically sinks a query for you? Misspelling my name (or not using it at all) and not following the JRA guidelines are two things that stand out, but not such that I would automatically decline a query. That said, proofreading is your friend!

15.  What three things are at the top of your submission wish list? These can and will change over time, but as of summer 2018 I’d love: an original standalone YA fantasy, more diverse YA, and a compelling yet commercial women’s fiction novel with a thread of romance.

16.  What are some of your favorite movies or books to give us an idea of your tastes? In adult I love: ELEANOR OLIPHANT IS COMPLETELY FINE by Gail Honeyman, THE NIGHT CIRCUS by Erin Morgenstern, THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN by Garth Stein, and THE GIRLS AT 17 SWANN STREET by Yara Zgheib. On the YA side I love: I’LL GIVE YOU THE SUN by Jandy Nelson, THE WRATH AND THE DAWN by Renee Ahdieh, and RED WHITE AND ROYAL BLUE by Casey McQuinston.

____________________________________________________________________

     
      Jessica Errera was born and raised on Long Island and credits her love of reading to the built-in book club that is her large family. Jess attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she earned a BA in English and Dramatic Arts before returning home to New York in search of the elusive “real world job.” Luckily, JRA was in need of interns and, in the tradition of good romance novels, it was love at first sight. Jessica now works full-time as an assistant to Meg, reading to her heart’s content while also tracking book sales and PR. A self-proclaimed book nerd, Jess can often be found curled up on the couch with the latest bestseller. Her favorite genres include young and new adult, contemporary fiction, fantasy, and anything that can be read in a day on the beach.

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

My Successful Query

Here's the query for my fourth manuscript that got me my first agent. It was for an MG fantasy with talking hamsters. I think the specific details and voice helped attract agents. I only wrote five versions of this one, while my other queries got dozens of versions. I received two offers from cold queries. 



Tom, the classroom hamster, wants to escape from the h-e-double-hockey-sticks otherwise known as school. His military training at the pet shop didn't include playing house or being sentenced to a boot camp of never-ending Show ‘n Tell, math facts rap, and story time. But he’s learned a lot behind the bars of his cage. For example, if you want to keep breathing, never trust a pygmy who has earned the nickname Squeezer. Somehow he has to get away before the pygmies dress him as Strawberry Shortcake again—or worse.

When a “subspatoot” teacher fills in, Tom sees his chance to put Operation Escape the Pygmies into action. He makes a run for the border, hamster style. Bad news. The principal says a rodent on the loose is a distraction to learning and better off erased. The way out is turned into a battlefield of snapping mousetraps, sticky snares, and poisoned pellets.

Tom seems doomed until the friendless Squeezer lends an over-excited hand. She quickly goes from supervillain to super sidekick. Now, the greatest obstacle to his freedom may be Tom’s soft spot for this lonely pygmy.



This story didn't sell, but my next did. My Birth of Saints series was published with Harper Voyager. Somewhere in the middle of my trilogy my first agent stopped responding and eventually quit the business. I ended up getting picked up by her boss, but sometimes things just don't work out. I'm on my own now, writing a fresh story and querying an epic fantasy. I share this just to let you know that the journey goes on and everyone's writing story will be different. 

Monday, July 23, 2018

Getting the Call with Doug Engstrom

There's nothing more inspiring to me than a Call Story from one of my contests. Doug was part of Sun versus Snow 2017. I remember his entry was very unique. A corporate gunslinger trying to pay off her student debt. He just recently announced his book deal. Congrats, Doug! But here is his story in his own words.




Many years ago I rode a non-competitive bicycling event where the objective was to complete a 600 kilometer course in 40 hours or less. That ride and related distance events, called brevets, turned out to be surprisingly good preparation to write a novel, secure representation for it, and sell it to a publisher.

The first carryover lesson is the obvious one: persistence. The successful brevet rider keeps the pedals turning, no matter what. You keep going through the stuff you were ready for, like cold mist, and the stuff you weren't, like going over the handlebars into a poorly-marked construction site in the dark.

As a writer, same deal. Keep turning out the words, keep turning out the queries, no matter what. Keep going through the inevitable barrage of rejection. In my case, it was 59 carefully-personalized queries rejected before connecting with my agent via the Sun vs Snow contest, followed by a dozen publisher rejections before securing a contract.

The related lesson is that there is no real end. Finish the 200K brevet course? Two weeks later, the 300K beckons. Then the 400K and the 600K. Complete that series, and you're eligible for one of the 1,200K events. After that? Next season.

In writing, the struggle to write the book isn't the end; more like "the end of the beginning." It's followed by rounds of editing, work on the query letter and queries, also edited many times over, and then the search for an agent or editor.

It's tempting to view securing representation as an end, because it's such a daunting task. But of course, it isn't.

In my case, I knew I had some serious work to do when I signed with my agent. Despite nearly four years of effort that included terrific support from my wife and excellent feedback from workshop partners and beta readers, I knew the book could be better. I also knew I needed focused professional input to get there.

When I signed, I anticipated my agent would provide that input, and she came through in the best possible way.

I did not anticipate it would take two major rewrites and ten months.

I also failed to anticipate that the extensively sweated over, massively-revised manuscript would be accepted by Harper Voyager contingent on another substantial rewrite, but that's what happened.

So, I'm working on that, heading for a due date in 2019 and publication the following year.

Which brings me to the final carryover lesson: you're in this alone, except of course you're not.

During a brevet, the rules stress that a rider must be "self sufficient" between checkpoints.

Like most claims to self sufficiency, this is somewhere between a gross exaggeration and an outright lie. On the road, riders share everything from Gatorade to air pumps, and at the check points, friends and family members furnish what's needed: encouragement, shoulder massages, even turkey sandwiches. 

As a writer, it's true that only you can put your hands on the keyboard and face the empty page. However, I don't think you'll keep it up very long without a contingent of cheerleaders, critique partners, beta readers, and fellow writers to share the journey.

In my case, I know I couldn't have produced my initial drafts without the help of my wife, Catherine, who read everything and offered amazing feedback. The relationships formed in the  Paradise ICON Writer's Group and the Dire Turtles Online Crit Group have been vital. I definitely could not have created a credible query without the help of my Sun vs Snow mentor, Michael Mammay, and I wouldn't have met him without the generosity of Michelle and Amy in putting the contest together in the first place.

On top of everything else, there's the contribution of my agent, Danielle Burby of the Nelson Literary Agency, who pushed me to the next level and sold the resulting manuscript.

As I write this, I'm taking the first steps in starting a new working partnership with David Pomerico and Harper Voyager.

This is a pretty big crowd for a solitary occupation, and both an inspiration and a reminder to do my bit when I'm part of somebody else's crowd.

So, stick with it, stick it out, and stick together--lessons for both long distance cycling and longform writing. I hope to see you around.

_____________________________________________

Doug Engstrom has been a farmer's son, a US Air Force officer, a technical writer, a computer support specialist and a business analyst, as well as being a writer of speculative fiction. His novel, Corporate Gunslinger, will be published by Harper Voyager in 2020. He lives near Des Moines, Iowa with his wife, Catherine Engstrom.  

Friday, July 20, 2018

Query Questions with Ann Rose



Two Query Questions in one week! I'm feeling lucky!

I hope to bring you many fresh interviews with agents from fresh agencies. Feel free to throw agent suggestions at me on twitter. 

Writers have copious amounts of imagination. It's what makes their stories so fantastic. But there's a darker side to so much out of the box thinking. When a writer is in the query trenches, their worries go into overdrive. They start pulling out their hair and imagine every possible disaster.

Here to relieve some of that endless worrying is a series called Query Questions. I'll ask the questions which prey on every writer's mind, and hopefully take some of the pain out of querying. These are questions that I've seen tossed around on twitter and other writing sites. They are the type of questions that you need answers from the real expert--agents!

Today we hear from an agent at an agency I've never interviewed before. We boldly go where I've never gone before. :-)  Ann Rose of the Prospect Agency answers to your questions about querying and shares information about her wishlist.


Do you look at sample pages without fail or only if the query is strong?

So, the answer is yes and no. Yes, I always look at sample pages no matter how strong the query is. Query letters are hard and not everyone is a master at them. In the end its about the book, so good query or not I’m going to check out the writing. However, if the query states it is something I don’t represent I won’t look at the pages.


How open are you to writers who have never been published?

I am completely open to new writers. I love finding fresh voices and new perspectives. Everyone has to start somewhere, right?


The dreaded rhetorical question in a query. Are they as taboo as the rumors say?

For me the answer is, yes. I hate them. Any question can be turned into a statement that doesn’t make the reader want to stop and think about the answer.


How important are comp titles? Is it something you want to see in a query? Are movie/tv reference okay as comp titles?

Comp titles won’t make or break a query. A good comp will intrigue me into reading, but a bad one (like a book I don’t particularly love) won’t stop me from looking at pages either. I think it’s fine to reference movies/TV/video games. Anything that helps set the tone for the story you are tying to tell.


Do you prefer a little personalized chit-chat in a query letter or would you rather hear about the manuscript?

I don’t need chit-chat that is just telling me what is on my own website. If the personalization is; “I’m sending you my YA book because you rep YA.” I say, skip it. I love personalization that feels personal, without being creepy stalker stuff.


How many queries do you receive in a week? How many requests might you make out of those?

I receive about a hundred letters a week give or take, and of those I ask for approximately one out of every ten.


How do you feel about writers nudging on full/partial requests? At what point is it appropriate? 

I don’t mind writers checking in but give me at least three months before you nudge.

If the writer gets an offer or has a question I’m always open to those.


When a writer nudges with an offer, what length of time is helpful to give you enough time to consider? A week? Two weeks?

Two weeks is perfect, in my opinion.


Many agents say they don't care if writers are active online. Could a twitter account or blog presence by a writer tip the scales in getting a request or offer? And do you require writers you sign to start one?

If an author includes their Twitter handle in a query 9x out of 10 I will look them up. If I’ve been on the fence about the project and see things that I like or find interesting on their feed I might be more likely to ask for the project.

I am no social media expert by any means, so I think that you have to do what feels right for you. If the idea of tweeting makes you sick, don’t do it. If you love to take pictures maybe Instagram would be better. I think having a social media presence can help, but if the idea of keeping one up makes you want to rip your eyelashes off – hard pass. I’d never require my clients to do anything they weren’t comfortable with, that includes being active on social media.


If a writer makes changes to their manuscript due to feedback should they resend the query or only if material was requested? Does it make a difference if the changes are from an R&R with another agent?

I’m not sure if I’m understanding this question correctly. Did I already ask for the materials? If yes, then yes, send an updated file.

If this is a project I didn’t request, and it’s been a long time since I’ve seen it and drastic changes have been made I’m open to seeing it in my query box again. Just don’t send the same project a few months later with the exact same submission. Our system lets us see all the submission history of querying writers.  


What themes are you sick of seeing?

Do not send me your character waking up in the first pages. I think after seeing this over and over and over I just can’t handle it anymore. If the first words are “And she opened her eyes” I’ve already checked out and stopped reading.


Do you look at trends or editor wishlists when deciding to sign a manuscript?

No. It’s in my opinion that good books will sell no matter the trend. So, if you have a super kick ass vampire novel, send it my way.


Do you consider yourself a hands-on, editorial type of agent? Does a manuscript have to be sub-ready or will you sign stories that need work?

I am super editorial, and I’m not afraid of a manuscript that needs some work. But that doesn’t mean send me a first draft.

My clients all have my cell phone number and know it’s fine to text or call whenever. If they are stuck on a plot point and need to chat, pick up the phone. If they need some general encouragement because they are working on edits, shoot a text. I think the worst thing I could do for my clients is to make them feel like they can’t talk to me. They all know if they email me they will get an answer within 24 hours but most likely sooner. We are a team and I am here to support them.


What is your biggest query pet peeve? Is there anything that automatically sinks a query for you?

Let me see…

Sending me a book that is already published. This seems like a no brainier, but I get at least once a week - “I don’t want to market this book that I put up on Amazon two years ago and haven’t sold any copies of, I just want to write so I’m looking for an agent.” – Don’t do this.

Sending me a book that is way outside the standard word count for that genre.

Sending me a query that talks for paragraphs and paragraphs about marketing and how it’s the next best seller, but never once tells me about the book.

Not following submission guidelines. So, make sure you include a query, synopsis and 30 pages.

I think those are my biggest pet peeves.  


What three things are at the top of your submission wish list?

Diverse voices!
A YA version of Clue with the snark/humor of the movie and complete with three different endings. (I need this book like yesterday.)
MG that isn’t afraid to explore tough topics


What are some of your favorite movies or books to give us an idea of your tastes? 

This is tough…

Favorite books:

The Awesome by Eva Darrows
Love Simon by Becky Albertalli
The Wishing Heart by JC Welker
500 Words or Less by Juleah del Rosario
The Fault in our Stars by John Green
Hush Hush series by Becca Fitzpatrick
The Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare
The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

Anything by Jennifer Armentrout, Elizabeth Briggs, Courtney Summers or E. Lockhart.

Movies:
Notting Hill
My Big Fat Greek Wedding
Miss Potter
Elf
The Blindside
Meet the Robinsons
Clue
Pitch Perfect
Jumanji
The Princess Bride


_____________________________________________________________

I'm a California native who now resides in Texas after a stint in Florida. Each place has its pros and cons, but I can say that I left my heart in San Diego and dream of going back one day (although that will probably never happen). My degree is in Communication from San Diego State University, and my resume holds a gamut of jobs from Life Guard to Business Systems Analyst/Portfolio Manager, but books have always been my passion. I'm excited to finally merge my love of literature with my past professional experiences as a literary agent with Prospect. It is my honor to help authors build successful, sustainable careers.
I fell in love with young adult books when my niece asked me to read with her and I remain devoted to YA of all genres. I am looking for characters who aren't afraid to stand up for their convictions and beliefs — whether they fight with their fists or their words. I'm also open to all genres of middle grade, and especially love stories that push the MG boundary by exploring topics that affect middle graders but aren't always broached in stories written for them. In the adult arena, I adore swoony romances, light sci-fi or fantasy, commercial fiction, and heartwarming — or heart wrenching — contemporaries. I'm always looking for unique voices, diverse perspectives, vivid settings, and stories that explore tough topics. Dark and edgy is totally okay too. Above all I'm looking for compelling characters who make me think in new ways, and laugh and cry, hopefully in the same story!
My clients know I'm ready to roll up my sleeves to help create the best books possible, from brainstorming at the idea stage all the way through submissions and beyond. I love attending conferences, and sharing my knowledge of the publishing industry. I am a member of the SCBWI, YARWA and RWA.  Twitter